Teatern: Part Two

Photo: Martin Henningsson

Photo: Martin Henningsson

It’s not unusual, most shopping malls boast a food court choc-a-bloc with fast food concepts. You have your hot dogs, the pizza, a bowl of noodles and a kebab. The difference at Teatern, the food court that opened in December of last year at Ringen’s shopping mall by Skanstull, is that the hodge podge of culinary concepts have been created by some of the sharpest chefs in town, proprietors of Michelin stars and makers on Nobel Prize dinners. One year after its inception, we check in the chefs in question to gauge the state of this Södermalm food destination, to talk about their concepts and the future of dinings. We continue with Mama Delicious Roasts, Caos and The Plant.

Marco Baudone (Mama Delicious Roasts)

What was it that attracted you to open up in a food court in a shopping mall? And would you have been interested if you didn’t know what other names were involved?

I’d been wanting to try out a new concept for a while when I was asked if I wanted to set up shop in Teatern. I had the time, the place felt right and the company of the other chefs appealed to me so I decided to open.

Do you think the idea of having a smaller lunch spot in a prime location as well as running another venture will be more common in the future?

Yes, I believe so.

How did your concept come about, was it all ready and waiting for a location or is it tailor-made for Teatern?

A bit of both. I already had my signature dish ready, my Italian porchetta which follows an old family recipe. But I fine-tuned the concept for Teatern.

In a way Teatern is just a food court, but at the same time it isn’t. In your opinion, what sets Teatern apart from other lunch destinations?

A combination of things. The food holds a very high quality, the variety is good, the price is right and it’s a nice environment to be in.

How well does Stockholm’s food scene stack up internationally? And what, if anything, would you say is missing?

Stockholm’s food scene has come far, but is still relatively young. Overall the restaurants are on a very high level. However, sometimes I miss the small street food restaurants that are basically a hole in the wall that you can find in other large cities around the world.


What interesting food trends will we see in 2017?

We will probably see more social eating, casual dining and casual fast food. Restaurants that allows the guests to be a bit more spontaneous and save time. Moreover, the importance of where an ingredient comes from and how it was produced will continue to increase.

 

Stefano Catenacci (Caos)

What was it that attracted you to open up in a food court in a shopping mall? And would you have been interested if you didn’t know what other names were involved?

I really liked the idea of gathering a variety of established chefs, all serving food of a really high quality.

Do you think the idea of having a smaller lunch spot in a prime location, alongside running another venture will be more common in the future?

It seems to be the new trend. Many run a fine dining restaurant and then you have a more basic venue.

How did your concept come about, was it all ready and waiting for a location or is it tailor-made for Teatern?

I’ve had the idea to open a restaurant that only serves small dishes for a long time. It fit well with Teatern so it felt natural to open Caos there.

In a way Teatern is just a food court, but at the same time it isn’t. In your opinion, what sets Teatern apart from other lunch destinations?

The range of food served at Teatern is not available anywhere else. Ten established chefs making basic food at a really high level is unique.

How well does Stockholm’s food scene stack up internationally? And what, if anything, would you say is missing?

Sweden has a pretty high standard. Though I feel that the new Nordic cooking is more about finding new ingredients that we haven’t eaten before.

What interesting food trends will we see in 2017?

I think we are moving back to the roots. The molecular style of cooking is disappearing and I feel we are going back to the dishes themselves, seeing the ingredient you want to eat.

 

 

Maximillian Lundin (The Plant)

What was it that attracted you to open up in a food court in a shopping mall? And would you have been interested if you didn’t know what other names were involved?

To be able to reach out with vegan food to people who don’t actively seek it. And being able reach part of the stream of people moving in Ringen that didn’t think that they would want to eat vegan. The names didn’t really matter.

Do you think the idea of having a smaller lunch spot in a prime location, as well as running another venture will be more common in the future?

I think it’s a mix. In a smaller lunch spot you don’t have the same amount of control of the guest experience as you have in a larger restaurant. However, there is definitely an upside to having a smaller venue close to others.

How did your concept come about, was it all ready and waiting for a location or is it tailor-made for Teatern?

It was already in my head. I wanted to make something concretely vegan and when I got the question if I wanted to be a part of Teatern I tailor-made those ideas to fit the scene.

In a way Teatern is just a food court, but at the same time it isn’t. In your opinion, what sets Teatern apart from other lunch destinations?

Teatern has an inviting atmosphere, it’s easy to sit down to talk and socialize here. It is also the variation. You can go here with a big group of friends and everyone can find something they want to eat for a very fair price, given the high quality.

How well does Stockholm’s food scene stack up internationally? And what, if anything, would you say is missing?

Stockholm’s food scene is of an international standard. You can find a lot of really good restaurants here but I would like there to be a few more vegan places.

What interesting food trends will we see in 2017?

More thought through, innovative and well-made plant-based vegan food.